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Reds Rumors: Cozart, Cordero, Votto

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GOODYEAR, AZ - MARCH 03: Zack Cozart #60 of the Cincinnati Reds turns a double play as Ivan De Jesus #65 of the Los Angeles Dodgers slides into second base at Goodyear Ballpark on March 3, 2011 in Goodyear, Arizona.  (Photo by Norm Hall/Getty Images)
GOODYEAR, AZ - MARCH 03: Zack Cozart #60 of the Cincinnati Reds turns a double play as Ivan De Jesus #65 of the Los Angeles Dodgers slides into second base at Goodyear Ballpark on March 3, 2011 in Goodyear, Arizona. (Photo by Norm Hall/Getty Images)
Getty Images

The Reds are presumably awfully disappointed by their sub-.500 record this season, especially given this spring's high expectations, which explains why most of the talk regarding the club is now focused on the offseason. That's the nice thing about MLBDD, though: we freaking love the offseason. So let's delve into some stuff that we'll deal with in a month or two, because we like to talk about this stuff.

  • The Reds expect Zack Cozart to emerge as the club's everyday shortstop next season, according to John Fay of the Cincinnati Enquirer. An injury prevented the 26-year-old from establishing himself this season, but he posted strong Triple-A numbers and will be first in line to get a shot next year.
  • In another report from Fay, we get word that the Reds have approached closer Francisco Cordero about a possible return for next season. Cordero, 36, has posted a strong ERA and good save numbers despite weak peripherals. The Reds hold a $12 million option for next season on him, but the expectation appears to be that the club will turn down the extension and try to agree to a two- or three-year deal with the reliever.
  • Over at Redleg Nation, Jason Linden took a look at the possibility of the team trading star first baseman Joey Votto. Recently, I suggested that Votto could really shake up the market if he's made available, but Linden concludes that trading the slugger "isn’t likely to help the team as much as hanging on to him."